Friday, January 6, 2017

Challenge Link-Up Post: Classic in Translation


Please link your reviews for your Classic in Translation here.  This is only for the Classic in Translation category.  These should all be classics that were originally written in a language other than your primary language; that is, if you are a native English speaker, it should be a classic written in another language other than English.  If you are not a native English speaker, it could be in English (or any other language, other than your primary language). If you want to read the book in its original language, that's fine too!

If you do not have a blog, or somewhere public on the internet where you post book reviews, please write your mini-review/thoughts in the comments section.  If you like, you can include the name of your blog and/or the title of the book in your link, like this: "Karen K. @ Books and Chocolate (Les Miserables)."


12 comments:

  1. This category was a free choice for me because I've decided against reading any classics in my native language for this challenge, so I picked a classic I wanted to read for ages, Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh. -Anahit

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  2. Somebody I respect told me that a person that really likes to drink doesn't need a reason to drink, but it always bugged me that Waugh never specifies in Brideshead Revisited why Sebastian drinks. Recently it bugged me that in The Steppe Checkhov does not say why the uncle and priest let the kid travel with the rough-neck drovers and shepherds. Details, details.....

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  3. I just finished The Case of Comrade Tulayev by Victor Serge (1947, translated from the French by William Trask). It's a fantastic novel about the Stalinist purges of the '30s. I had to put it down after every few chapters and walk away, because it had so many dark and amazing reflections about what living in a country run by a paranoid man and a bunch of ideologues who put the power of their party over the good of their nation can do to people's bodies, minds, and souls. It was a little * too * resonant with the current times. The translation also should get a lot of credit for perfectly capturing the Soviet "doublespeak" that Orwell parodied in 1984 and Animal Farm.

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  4. I read Verne's The Mysterious Island because my sons have wanted me to read it for ages. It is their favorite Verne. I certainly see why young teens would love it! It was a lot of fun, even if there was a bear which was like a koala but was actually a sloth . . . still fun. :-)

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  5. No accusing me of doing this the easy way. I just posted a link to my review of Les Miserables. It was excellent.

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  6. Just finished all 900+ pages of Herodotus's Histories in the excellent "The Landmark Herodotus" edition. Highly recommended if you're a history geek!

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  7. Sharing my first review for "The Parent Trap", which was a lot of fun after growing up on these movies!

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  8. My Thucydides review is finally up! (I finished the book on Saturday). It's my 3rd book for this challenge (after Hadji Murat for Russian novel and Herodotus's Histories for my pre-1800 classic). Totally worth it. (It would have amused me to put this in the category "Place you'd like to visit" because I would, but, er, not at the time. I have a few possibilities for that category, though, so I'll save it...)

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  9. Just added 'Cancer Ward' by Solzhenitsyn. Love this man's writing!

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  10. Just read The Three Musketeers, my first Dumas, and loved it!

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  11. I read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain in Norwegian. This was kind of an easy challenge, as most classics are not Norwegian :p

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  12. I found reading Kristin Lavransdatter:The Wreath much more enthralling than I expected. Even though it is set in 14th century Norway the coming of age theme seems very relevant to today. I will definitely read Volumes 2 and 3.

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